Dispeker Artists, Inc.

Alexander Korsantia

Alexander Korsantia


Piano

Dubbed “a major artist” by the Miami Herald and a “quiet maverick” by the Daily Telegraph, pianist Alexander Korsantia has been praised for the “clarity of his technique, richly varied tone and dynamic phrasing” (Baltimore Sun), and a “piano technique where difficulties simply do not exist” (Calgary Sun). The Boston Globe found his interpretation of his signature piece, Pictures at an Exhibition, to be “a performance that could annihilate all others one has heard.” And the Birmingham Post wrote: “his intensely responsive reading was shot through with a vein of constant fantasy, whether musing or mercurial.” Ever since winning the First Prize/Gold Medal at the Artur Rubinstein Piano Master Competition and the First Prize at the Sidney International Piano Competition, Korsantia’s career has taken him to many of the world’s major concert halls, collaborating with renowned conductors such as Christoph Eschenbach, Gianandrea Noseda, Jansug Kakhidze, Valery Gergiev, and Paavo Järvi, with such orchestras as the Chicago Symphony, Kirov Orchestra, RAI Orchestra in Turin, The City of Birmingham Symphony, Cincinnati Symphony, and Israel Philharmonic.

In the current and coming seasons Mr. Korsantia performs Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major with the Boston Philharmonic, Akron Symphony and Xiamen Philharmonic, Rachmaninoff’s Third with Israel Symphony, Prokofiev’s Second with Stuttgart Philharmoniker and Telavi Festival in Georgia, Beethoven’s Fourth with Israel Philharmonic, Chopin Second with the Jerusalem Symphony and the Ingolstadt Chamber Orchestra. With The Far Cry chamber group he is going to perform Galina Ustvolskaya’s Piano Concerto in Boston and Tbilisi, Georgia. In addition, he plays recitals at the National Concert Hall in Taipei, Washington D.C., the Walnut Hill School, Greenfield Village (Michigan), Blaibach, Germany, Lodz (Poland), Jordan Hall in Boston, Cincinnati Conservatory, Shanghai Concert Hall, Chengdu Conservatory Hall as well as extensive recital tour in Israel and Georgia.

Mr. Korsantia’s past engagements include appearances with the Huntsville, Pacific, Louisville, Bogota, San Juan, Jerusalem, Oregon, Vancouver, Omaha, New Orleans, Elgin, Mannheim, Tokyo, Louisiana, Oslo, Malaga and Israel symphony orchestras; Georgian Sinfonieta; Ingolstadt and Israel chamber orchestras; Jerusalem Camerata; Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse; Polish Radio Orchestra; and Orquesta Sinfonica Nacional in Mexico City, among others. He has been heard in the Piano Jacobins concert series in Toulouse; in Warsaw, Boston, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Vancouver, Calgary, San Francisco, Lodz; with the White Nights Festival in St. Petersburg; at the Tanglewood, Newport, Stresa, Gilmore, and Verbier festivals and music series, performing solo recitals and collaborating with musicians such as Vadim Repin, Miriam Fried, Kim Kashkashian, Sergei Nakariakov and the Stradivari Quartet among others. Bel Air Music and Piano Classics are among the recording labels Mr. Korsantia has worked with. The most recent release is a collection of Beethoven (Eroica Variations), Rachmaninoff (Chopin Variations), and Copland (Piano Variations). Mr. Korsantia has served and is scheduled to serve on jury panels of major piano competitions such as Arthur Rubinstein, Cleveland International and Toronto International, Hilton Head and E-Competitions. His solo piano transcription of Ravel’s La valse is waiting to be published by Sikorski Musikverlage.

Born in Tbilisi, Georgia, Alexander Korsantia began his musical studies at an early age with his mother, Sventlana Korsantia, and later became a pupil of Tengiz Amiredjibi, Georgia’s foremost piano instructor. In 1992, he moved his family to the United States and joined the famed piano studio of fellow Georgian, Alexander Toradze, at Indiana University in South Bend. In 1999, he was awarded one of the most prestigious national awards, the Order of Honor, bestowed on him by then-President Eduard Shevardnadze. He is a recipient of the Golden Wing award (2015) and Georgia’s National State Prize (1997). Korsantia resides in Boston where he is a Professor of Piano on the faculty of the New England Conservatory. Mr. Korsantia is the artistic adviser of the annual music festival “From Easter to Ascension” in Georgia.

Doing Right by Russia

“Korsantia, who was born in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi and is now on the piano faculty at New England Conservatory, has the formidable technique the concerto requires, and he took just enough license.”

– Jeffrey Gantz, The Boston Musical IntelligencerRelated Link

Pianist Kosantia Shines in Boston Philharmonic’s Russian Program

Korsantia shone brightest in the variations of the second movement. But throughout, from the fiery first movement to the haunting third, he played with the sensitivity of a chamber musician. The orchestra, under Zander’s guide, wrapped Korsantia in silvery sheets of sound.

– Aaron Keebaugh, Boston Classical ReviewRelated Link

Korsantia’s Musical Masonry

Whether or not it’s chiefly a matter of age, with the commanding and articulate presentation of pianist Alexander Korsantia, we reach another level of musical maturity. In his 50s, this Republic of Georgia-born NEC faculty member gave an ear-popping and—for me though not for everyone—soul-stirring recital Tuesday evening in the Foundation for Chinese Performing Arts Summer Festival at the Walnut Hill School.

– David Moran, The Boston Musical IntelligencerRelated Link

Sonic explosions close DSSO’s season

The Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra’s season came to a close Saturday night at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center’s Symphony Hall with a variety of musical pyrotechnics making up the “Now and Then” program celebrating the organization’s 85th anniversary.

The whole orchestra was all in at the beginning of Dominick Argento’s “Valentino Dances,” which set up a dazzling accordion cadenza by Dee Langley. Then the orchestra launched in a sultry tango that took a romantic turn. It made me wonder if Argento was secretly scoring one of Rudolph Valentino’s silent films. The dramatic conclusion was certainly worthy of dancing your partner across the terrazzo.

A short film celebrating the DSSO’s history was shown, with the audience applauding conductor Dirk Meyer’s mention of the five-year contract keeping him in town.

For his latest return to Duluth, pianist Alexander Korsantia tackled Frédéric Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 2, emphasizing the composer’s sense of playfulness with the music in the first movement and showcasing his signature strength of finding the sweet spot to be heard playing against the orchestra.

The second movement larghetto was one of the evening’s highlights, with a captivating sequence with Korsantia playing notes as fragile as glass. Another sequence of runs up and down the keyboard had the notes fading away at the end of each pass. The orchestra followed suit as the music beautifully faded away to the final note.

Immediately the final movement began, with Korsantia unleashing the full power of his playing. At one point I was reminded of Prokofiev’s Third Piano Concerto, which makes perfect sense since Korsantia played it at the start of the DSSO’s 2015 season.

Korsantia and Meyer embraced in a bear hug and the audience was on its feet before the pianist had turned around from shaking hands with orchestra members. Presented with a bouquet of flowers, Korsantia gallantly gave them to one of the violinists before bowing repeatedly to the orchestra.

If Korsantia is not back again in the near future, I will not be the only one who will be totally surprised and bitterly disappointed.

Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4 has the distinction of being the first DSSO piece back in 1933. The horns and bassoons introduced the theme of “Fate.” As an audio-visual treat, the WDSE broadcast of the concert was projected on both sides of Symphony Hall. The timing was spot on, but when the camera made Meyer BFG size it was hard not to follow the constant motion of his giant floating hands.

A moody melody by Darci Gamerl’s oboe began the second movement. Later Claudia White’s flute soared around and above the music. The theme passed from clarinet to oboe to flute before taken over by Michael Roemhildt’s bassoon in a beautiful passage.

The scherzo was truly precocious. The strings play pizzicato throughout. The oboe and flute take over for the woodwinds and then the brass have their turn, playing staccato, before another string section. Tchaikovsky plays the strings against the woodwinds and then has the brass and timpani join in before the movement ends as it began, quietly with pizzicato strings.

Then the final movement exploded. Tchaikovsky has no rival when it comes to music making you hear fireworks. The symphony ended in rhythmic overdrive which compelled the entire audience to erupt into applause the second the last note detonated.

– Lawrence Bernabo, Duluth News TribuneRelated Link

 

Alexander Korsantia Live in Concert – Bel Air Music | Released


Orchestral

  • Bach
    Concerto No. 1 in d minor, BWV 1052
    Concerto No. 7 in g minor, BWV 1058

    Bardanashvili
    Concerto quasi una fantasia (1996)

    Beethoven
    Concerto in E-flat Major, WoO 4 (1784)
    Concerto No. 4 in G Major, Op.58
    Concerto No. 5 in E-flat Major, “Emperor,” Op.73

    Brahms
    Concerto No. 1 in d minor, Op. 15
    Concerto No. 2 in B-flat Major, Op. 83

    Chausson
    Concerto for Violin, Piano and Chamber Orchestra

    Chopin
    Concerto No. 1 in e minor, Op. 11
    Concerto No. 2 in f minor, Op.21

    Dvorak
    Concerto Op. 33 in g minor

    Grieg
    Concerto in a minor, Op. 16

    Liszt
    Concerto No. 1 in E-flat Major, S. 124
    Totentanz (Dance of Death), S. 126, R. 457

    Mozart
    Concerto No. 9 in E-flat Major, KV 271
    Concerto No. 21 in C Major, KV 467
    Concert No. 24 in c minor, KV 491
    Concerto No. 27 in B-flat Major, KV 595

    Prokofiev
    Concerto No. 1 in D-Flat Major, Op. 10
    Concerto No. 2 in g minor, Op. 16
    Concerto No. 3 in C major, Op. 26

    Rachmaninov
    Concerto No. 1 Op. 1 in f-sharp minor
    Concerto No.2 Op. 18 in c minor
    Concerto No. 3 in d minor, Op.30
    Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini, Op.43

    Ravel
    Concerto in G Major
    Concerto for the Left Hand

    Scriabin
    Piano Concerto in f-sharp minor, Op. 20

    Shostakovich
    Concerto in c minor for Piano, Trumpet, and String Orchestra, Op. 35

    Stravinsky
    Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments

    Tchaikovsky
    Piano Concerto No. 1 in b-flat minor

Sample Recital Programs

  • Program 1: ALL BEETHOVEN
    Beethoven: Sonata in A flat Major Op. 26
    Beethoven: Fifteen Variations with the Fugue in E flat major, Op 35
    Beethoven: Sonata in E flat Major, Op 7

    Program 2:
    Haydn: Sonata in C major Hob XVI/1
    Prokofiev: Sonata No 8, Op 84
    Haydn: Sonata in F Major Hob XVI/23
    Prokofiev: Sonata No 9, Op 103

    PROGRAM 3:
    Chopin: 24 Preludes Op 28
    Rachmaninoff: Variations on the Theme by Chopin Op. 22

    PROGRAM 4:
    Ravel: Valses nobles et sentimentales
    Ravel: La valse
    Schubert/Liszt:
    Soirees de Vienne
    Valse-Caprice No 4 
    Valse-Caprice No 6
    Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition

    PROGRAM 5:
    Schubert/Liszt
    Soirees de Vienne
    Valse-caprice No 4
    Rachmaninoff: Six moments musicaux Op. 16
    Schubert: Six moments musicaux Op. 94
    Schubert/Liszt
    Soirees de Vienne
    Valse-Caprice No 6

Orchestral

  • Bach
    Concerto No. 1 in d minor, BWV 1052
    Concerto No. 7 in g minor, BWV 1058

    Bardanashvili
    Concerto quasi una fantasia (1996)

    Beethoven
    Concerto in E-flat Major, WoO 4 (1784)
    Concerto No. 4 in G Major, Op.58
    Concerto No. 5 in E-flat Major, “Emperor,” Op.73

    Brahms
    Concerto No. 1 in d minor, Op. 15
    Concerto No. 2 in B-flat Major, Op. 83

    Chausson
    Concerto for Violin, Piano and Chamber Orchestra

    Chopin
    Concerto No. 1 in e minor, Op. 11
    Concerto No. 2 in f minor, Op.21

    Dvorak
    Concerto Op. 33 in g minor

    Grieg
    Concerto in a minor, Op. 16

    Liszt
    Concerto No. 1 in E-flat Major, S. 124
    Totentanz (Dance of Death), S. 126, R. 457

    Mozart
    Concerto No. 9 in E-flat Major, KV 271
    Concerto No. 21 in C Major, KV 467
    Concert No. 24 in c minor, KV 491
    Concerto No. 27 in B-flat Major, KV 595

    Prokofiev
    Concerto No. 1 in D-Flat Major, Op. 10
    Concerto No. 2 in g minor, Op. 16
    Concerto No. 3 in C major, Op. 26

    Rachmaninov
    Concerto No. 1 Op. 1 in f-sharp minor
    Concerto No.2 Op. 18 in c minor
    Concerto No. 3 in d minor, Op.30
    Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini, Op.43

    Ravel
    Concerto in G Major
    Concerto for the Left Hand

    Scriabin
    Piano Concerto in f-sharp minor, Op. 20

    Shostakovich
    Concerto in c minor for Piano, Trumpet, and String Orchestra, Op. 35

    Stravinsky
    Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments

    Tchaikovsky
    Piano Concerto No. 1 in b-flat minor

Sample Recital Programs

  • Program 1: ALL BEETHOVEN
    Beethoven: Sonata in A flat Major Op. 26
    Beethoven: Fifteen Variations with the Fugue in E flat major, Op 35
    Beethoven: Sonata in E flat Major, Op 7

    Program 2:
    Haydn: Sonata in C major Hob XVI/1
    Prokofiev: Sonata No 8, Op 84
    Haydn: Sonata in F Major Hob XVI/23
    Prokofiev: Sonata No 9, Op 103

    PROGRAM 3:
    Chopin: 24 Preludes Op 28
    Rachmaninoff: Variations on the Theme by Chopin Op. 22

    PROGRAM 4:
    Ravel: Valses nobles et sentimentales
    Ravel: La valse
    Schubert/Liszt:
    Soirees de Vienne
    Valse-Caprice No 4 
    Valse-Caprice No 6
    Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition

    PROGRAM 5:
    Schubert/Liszt
    Soirees de Vienne
    Valse-caprice No 4
    Rachmaninoff: Six moments musicaux Op. 16
    Schubert: Six moments musicaux Op. 94
    Schubert/Liszt
    Soirees de Vienne
    Valse-Caprice No 6

Audio

Stravinsky: Infernal Dance of Kastchei from Firebird

Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No. 7, Op. 83 – I. Allegro Inquetto

Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No. 8, Op. 84 – III. Vivace. Allegro ben marcato. Vivace coma prima

Chopin: Ballade No. 4, Op. 52

Mozart: Piano Sonata in C Major, K. 330 – III. Allegretto

Video

Documents

Short Biography

Dubbed “a major artist” by the Miami Herald and a “quiet maverick” by the Daily Telegraph, pianist Alexander Korsantia has been praised for the “clarity of his technique, richly varied tone and dynamic phrasing” (Baltimore Sun), and a “piano technique where difficulties simply do not exist” (Calgary Sun). The Boston Globe found his interpretation of his signature piece, Pictures at an Exhibition, to be “a performance that could annihilate all others one has heard.” And the Birmingham Post wrote that “his intensely responsive reading was shot through with a vein of constant fantasy, whether musing or mercurial.” Ever since winning the Gold Medal at the Artur Rubinstein Piano Master Competition and the First Prize at the Sidney International Piano Competition, Korsantia’s career has taken him to many of the world’s major concert halls, collaborating with renowned conductors such as Christoph Eschenbach, Gianandrea Noseda, Jansug Kakhidze, Valery Gergiev, and Paavo Järvi, with such orchestras as the Chicago Symphony, Kirov Orchestra, RAI Orchestra in Turin, The City of Birmingham Symphony, Cincinnati Symphony, and Israel Philharmonic.

 

Full Biography

Dubbed “a major artist” by the Miami Herald and a “quiet maverick” by the Daily Telegraph, pianist Alexander Korsantia has been praised for the “clarity of his technique, richly varied tone and dynamic phrasing” (Baltimore Sun), and a “piano technique where difficulties simply do not exist” (Calgary Sun). The Boston Globe found his interpretation of his signature piece, Pictures at an Exhibition, to be “a performance that could annihilate all others one has heard.” And the Birmingham Post wrote: “his intensely responsive reading was shot through with a vein of constant fantasy, whether musing or mercurial.” Ever since winning the First Prize/Gold Medal at the Artur Rubinstein Piano Master Competition and the First Prize at the Sidney International Piano Competition, Korsantia’s career has taken him to many of the world’s major concert halls, collaborating with renowned conductors such as Christoph Eschenbach, Gianandrea Noseda, Jansug Kakhidze, Valery Gergiev, and Paavo Järvi, with such orchestras as the Chicago Symphony, Kirov Orchestra, RAI Orchestra in Turin, The City of Birmingham Symphony, Cincinnati Symphony, and Israel Philharmonic.

In the current and coming seasons Mr. Korsantia performs Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major with the Boston Philharmonic, Akron Symphony and Xiamen Philharmonic, Rachmaninoff’s Third with Israel Symphony, Prokofiev’s Second with Stuttgart Philharmoniker and Telavi Festival in Georgia, Beethoven’s Fourth with Israel Philharmonic, Chopin Second with the Jerusalem Symphony and the Ingolstadt Chamber Orchestra. With The Far Cry chamber group he is going to perform Galina Ustvolskaya’s Piano Concerto in Boston and Tbilisi, Georgia. In addition, he plays recitals at the National Concert Hall in Taipei, Washington D.C., the Walnut Hill School, Greenfield Village (Michigan), Blaibach, Germany, Lodz (Poland), Jordan Hall in Boston, Cincinnati Conservatory, Shanghai Concert Hall, Chengdu Conservatory Hall as well as extensive recital tour in Israel and Georgia.

Mr. Korsantia’s past engagements include appearances with the Huntsville, Pacific, Louisville, Bogota, San Juan, Jerusalem, Oregon, Vancouver, Omaha, New Orleans, Elgin, Mannheim, Tokyo, Louisiana, Oslo, Malaga and Israel symphony orchestras; Georgian Sinfonieta; Ingolstadt and Israel chamber orchestras; Jerusalem Camerata; Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse; Polish Radio Orchestra; and Orquesta Sinfonica Nacional in Mexico City, among others. He has been heard in the Piano Jacobins concert series in Toulouse; in Warsaw, Boston, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Vancouver, Calgary, San Francisco, Lodz; with the White Nights Festival in St. Petersburg; at the Tanglewood, Newport, Stresa, Gilmore, and Verbier festivals and music series, performing solo recitals and collaborating with musicians such as Vadim Repin, Miriam Fried, Kim Kashkashian, Sergei Nakariakov and the Stradivari Quartet among others. Bel Air Music and Piano Classics are among the recording labels Mr. Korsantia has worked with. The most recent release is a collection of Beethoven (Eroica Variations), Rachmaninoff (Chopin Variations), and Copland (Piano Variations). Mr. Korsantia has served and is scheduled to serve on jury panels of major piano competitions such as Arthur Rubinstein, Cleveland International and Toronto International, Hilton Head and E-Competitions. His solo piano transcription of Ravel’s La valse is waiting to be published by Sikorski Musikverlage.

Born in Tbilisi, Georgia, Alexander Korsantia began his musical studies at an early age with his mother, Sventlana Korsantia, and later became a pupil of Tengiz Amiredjibi, Georgia’s foremost piano instructor. In 1992, he moved his family to the United States and joined the famed piano studio of fellow Georgian, Alexander Toradze, at Indiana University in South Bend. In 1999, he was awarded one of the most prestigious national awards, the Order of Honor, bestowed on him by then-President Eduard Shevardnadze. He is a recipient of the Golden Wing award (2015) and Georgia’s National State Prize (1997). Korsantia resides in Boston where he is a Professor of Piano on the faculty of the New England Conservatory. Mr. Korsantia is the artistic adviser of the annual music festival “From Easter to Ascension” in Georgia.