Dispeker Artists, Inc.

Emily Marvosh

Emily Marvosh


Contralto

Performing in such major venues as Carnegie Hall, Jordan Hall, Disney Hall, Prague’s Smetana Hall, and Vienna’s Stefansdom, American contralto Emily Marvosh has been gaining praise for her “flexible technique and ripe color,” “sterling voice,” and “tone that [has] the velvety soulfulness of a cello”. Her 2017-18 season currently includes two appearances as soloist in Handel’s Messiah: at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC and in a return to the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra. She also sings as soloist in Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis with Boston’s Cantata Singers.

In 2016-17 Ms. Marvosh made her debut with the Phoenix Symphony in Mozart’s Requiem; performed Handel’s Messiah with both American Bach Soloists and the Calvin Oratorio Society; Bach’s St. Matthew’s Passion with the Colorado Bach Ensemble; and Elgar’s Sea Pictures with the Orchestra of Indian Hill. Other recent engagements include Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, Handel’s Messiah, and Bach’s St. John Passion with the Handel and Haydn Society; John Corigliano’s Three Irish Folk Tunes with the Worcester Chamber Music Society; Stravinsky’s Les Noces with Chorus Pro Musica; Mahler’s Symphony No. 3 with the Tucson Symphony Orchestra; Third Lady in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte with Boston Baroque; and Messiahwith Music Worcester and the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra.

Following her solo debut at Boston’s Symphony Hall, she has been a frequent soloist with the Handel and Haydn Society under the direction of Harry Christophers. Other solo appearances include Messiah with Charlotte Symphony, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 with Music Worcester, Vivaldi’s Nisi Dominus with L’academie, Bach’s Magnificat with Back Bay Chorale, Elgar’s Sea Pictures with the Brookline Symphony, Dvořák’s Stabat Mater with the Chorus of Westerly, Vivaldi’s Salve Regina with the White Mountain Bach Festival, La Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein with Opera Boston, and Rusalka with Boston Lyric Opera. Past ensemble appearances include the Oregon Bach Festival under the direction of Helmut Rilling, the Bachakademie Stuttgart, Portland Baroque Orchestra, Tucson Chamber Artists, Boston Camerata, the Skylark Chamber Ensemble, the Yale Choral Artists, and Cambridge Concentus.

A regular member of the renowned vocal ensemble, Seraphic Fire, Miss Marvosh can be heard on their recent GRAMMY-nominated recording of Brahms’s Ein Deutsches Requiem. Personal awards include the prestigious Adams Fellowship at the Carmel Bach Festival, the American Prize in the Oratorio and Art Song divisions, and second place in the New England Regional NATSAA competition.

Her contributions to 21st-century repertoire and performance include world premieres with Juventas New Music and Intermezzo Chamber Opera. Marvosh created the roles of Viviane and the Mother in the world premiere of Hugo Kauder’s Merlin with the Hugo Kauder Society. She is a founding member of the Lorelei Ensemble, which promotes new music for women.
A frequent recitalist and proud native of Michigan, Emily Marvosh created a chamber recital, celebrating the history and culture of her home state, which won a St. Botolph Club Foundation Emerging Artist Award. She continues to perform the evening in venues across the country. She holds degrees from Central Michigan University and Boston University.

A ‘Missa Solemnis’ from the heart with Cantata Singers

“Throughout…contralto Emily Marvosh caught the eye with her rapt smile and the ear with her plum-wine voice…It was a performance from the heart, and if the audience’s response was any indication, Beethoven’s directive of “may it return” was fulfilled.”

– Zoe Madonna, The Boston GlobeRelated Link

Cantata Singers Outstanding in Missa Solemnis

“The soloists of the vocal quartet presented a fine ensemble of well-tuned voices: Dana Varga’s light and clear soprano matched the flexibility and clarity of Emily Marvosh’s contralto throughout her extensive range….Altogether, we heard an outstanding performance of a complex and difficult work that we don’t hear nearly often enough.”

– Virginia Newes, The Boston Musical IntelligencerRelated Link

Getting a Head Start on Leipzig Week

The first duet, “Sunday Morning”, featured Petrus’s and Marvosh’s admirably matched timbres as well as carefully worked out rubati and subtle dynamics from all three musicians as they portrayed the intimacy of individual prayer against the vast expanse of creation.

– Geoffrey Wieting, The Boston Musical IntelligencerRelated Link

From Annunciation to Nativity

“The master, Johann Sebastian was featured in two cantatas, beginning with Cantata 147, “Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben” with five superb soloists… [incuding] Emily Marvosh, contralto…. Brian Giebler, Emily Marvosh, and Peter Walker each made distinguished contributions.”

– Susan Miron, The Boston Musical IntelligencerRelated Link

Ferrier and Walter Movingly Evoked

“Contralto Emily Marvosh and the superb pianist Tanya Blaich rewarded last night’s packed Goethe-Institut Boston with an extraordinarily moving homage to the beloved British contralto Kathleen Ferrier (1912-1953) and eminent pianist/conductor Bruno Walter 1876-1962).”

– Susan Miron, The Boston Musical IntelligencerRelated Link

Messiah in Tempore Belli

“‘But Who May Abide’ glowed with awestruck veneration, and not just because of the anticipation generated by the compelling side story of how a singer with heart was plucked from the chorus like Ruby Keeler in 42nd Street. For her solo debut with H+H, sultry contralto Emily Marvosh emerged more like Lena Horne in Stormy Weather. In singing of her Refiner’s fire, she kindled her own, especially in the repeated verse which melded ornament and consolation most fittingly.”

– Lee Eiseman, The Boston Musical IntelligencerRelated Link

Symphony Hall basks in Christmas spirit with Handel’s Messiah

“In ‘Oh God that tellest good tidings to Zion,’ contralto Emily Marvosh performed with poise and grace. Her judicious use of ornamentation on the words ‘Behold your God’ was a beautiful enhancement to the music.”

– Mary McCleary, New Boston PostRelated Link

Handel and Haydn’s ‘Messiah’ is on message

“Alto Emily Marvosh gave an unearthly calm to ‘But who may abide the day of his coming?’ and was beautifully plainspoken in ‘He was despised and rejected of men.’”

– Jeffrey Gantz, Boston GlobeRelated Link

Orchestral

  • Bach
    Cantatas
    Christmas Oratorio
    Magnificat
    Mass in B Minor
    St. John Passion
    St. Matthew Passion

    Barber
    Dover Beach

    Beethoven
    Missa Solemnis
    Symphony No. 9

    Durufle
    Requiem

    Dvorak
    Stabat Mater

    Elgar
    Dream of Gerontius
    Sea Pictures

    Handel
    Dixit Dominus
    Israel in Egypt
    Judas Maccabaeus
    La resurezzione
    Messiah
    Solomon

    Haydn
    Creation
    Lord Nelson Mass

    Mahler
    Kindertotenlieder
    Symphony No. 2
    Symphony No. 3

    Mendelssohn
    Elijah

    Mozart
    Coronation Mass
    Mass in C Minor
    Requiem

    Pergolesi
    Stabat Mater

    Ravel
    Sheherazade

    Rossini
    Petite Messe Solenelle

    Stravinsky
    Les Noces

    Vivaldi
    Gloria
    Nisi Dominus
    Salve Regina

Orchestral

  • Bach
    Cantatas
    Christmas Oratorio
    Magnificat
    Mass in B Minor
    St. John Passion
    St. Matthew Passion

    Barber
    Dover Beach

    Beethoven
    Missa Solemnis
    Symphony No. 9

    Durufle
    Requiem

    Dvorak
    Stabat Mater

    Elgar
    Dream of Gerontius
    Sea Pictures

    Handel
    Dixit Dominus
    Israel in Egypt
    Judas Maccabaeus
    La resurezzione
    Messiah
    Solomon

    Haydn
    Creation
    Lord Nelson Mass

    Mahler
    Kindertotenlieder
    Symphony No. 2
    Symphony No. 3

    Mendelssohn
    Elijah

    Mozart
    Coronation Mass
    Mass in C Minor
    Requiem

    Pergolesi
    Stabat Mater

    Ravel
    Sheherazade

    Rossini
    Petite Messe Solenelle

    Stravinsky
    Les Noces

    Vivaldi
    Gloria
    Nisi Dominus
    Salve Regina

Audio

Handel: Messiah – He was Despised

Vivaldi: Nisi_Dominus – I. Largo

Schubert: “Der Tod und das Mädchen”

Mahler: Symphony No. 3 – O Mensch, gib Acht!

Mahler: Symphony No. 3 – Bimm Bamm! Es Sungen Drei Engel!

Rorem: Poems of Love and the Rain – Interlude

Documents

Short Biography

Performing in such major venues as Carnegie Hall, Jordan Hall, Disney Hall, Prague’s Smetana Hall, and Vienna’s Stefansdom, American contralto Emily Marvosh has been gaining praise for her “flexible technique and ripe color,” “sterling voice,” and “tone that [has] the velvety soulfulness of a cello”. Her 2017-18 season currently includes two appearances as soloist in Handel’s Messiah: at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC and in a return to the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra. She also sings as soloist in Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis with Boston’s Cantata Singers.

A regular member of the renowned vocal ensemble, Seraphic Fire, Miss Marvosh can be heard on their recent GRAMMY-nominated recording of Brahms’s Ein Deutsches Requiem. Personal awards include the prestigious Adams Fellowship at the Carmel Bach Festival, the American Prize in the Oratorio and Art Song divisions, and second place in the New England Regional NATSAA competition.

Full Biography

Performing in such major venues as Carnegie Hall, Jordan Hall, Disney Hall, Prague’s Smetana Hall, and Vienna’s Stefansdom, American contralto Emily Marvosh has been gaining praise for her “flexible technique and ripe color,” “sterling voice,” and “tone that [has] the velvety soulfulness of a cello”. Her 2017-18 season currently includes two appearances as soloist in Handel’s Messiah: at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC and in a return to the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra. She also sings as soloist in Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis with Boston’s Cantata Singers.

In 2016-17 Ms. Marvosh made her debut with the Phoenix Symphony in Mozart’s Requiem; performed Handel’s Messiah with both American Bach Soloists and the Calvin Oratorio Society; Bach’s St. Matthew’s Passion with the Colorado Bach Ensemble; and Elgar’s Sea Pictures with the Orchestra of Indian Hill. Other recent engagements include Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, Handel’s Messiah, and Bach’s St. John Passion with the Handel and Haydn Society; John Corigliano’s Three Irish Folk Tunes with the Worcester Chamber Music Society; Stravinsky’s Les Noces with Chorus Pro Musica; Mahler’s Symphony No. 3 with the Tucson Symphony Orchestra; Third Lady in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte with Boston Baroque; and Messiahwith Music Worcester and the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra.

Following her solo debut at Boston’s Symphony Hall, she has been a frequent soloist with the Handel and Haydn Society under the direction of Harry Christophers. Other solo appearances include Messiah with Charlotte Symphony, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 with Music Worcester, Vivaldi’s Nisi Dominus with L’academie, Bach’s Magnificat with Back Bay Chorale, Elgar’s Sea Pictures with the Brookline Symphony, Dvořák’s Stabat Mater with the Chorus of Westerly, Vivaldi’s Salve Regina with the White Mountain Bach Festival, La Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein with Opera Boston, and Rusalka with Boston Lyric Opera. Past ensemble appearances include the Oregon Bach Festival under the direction of Helmut Rilling, the Bachakademie Stuttgart, Portland Baroque Orchestra, Tucson Chamber Artists, Boston Camerata, the Skylark Chamber Ensemble, the Yale Choral Artists, and Cambridge Concentus.

A regular member of the renowned vocal ensemble, Seraphic Fire, Miss Marvosh can be heard on their recent GRAMMY-nominated recording of Brahms’s Ein Deutsches Requiem. Personal awards include the prestigious Adams Fellowship at the Carmel Bach Festival, the American Prize in the Oratorio and Art Song divisions, and second place in the New England Regional NATSAA competition.

Her contributions to 21st-century repertoire and performance include world premieres with Juventas New Music and Intermezzo Chamber Opera. Marvosh created the roles of Viviane and the Mother in the world premiere of Hugo Kauder’s Merlin with the Hugo Kauder Society. She is a founding member of the Lorelei Ensemble, which promotes new music for women.
A frequent recitalist and proud native of Michigan, Emily Marvosh created a chamber recital, celebrating the history and culture of her home state, which won a St. Botolph Club Foundation Emerging Artist Award. She continues to perform the evening in venues across the country. She holds degrees from Central Michigan University and Boston University.