Dispeker Artists, Inc.

Steven Fox

Steven Fox


Conductor Steven Fox has been called “visionary” by BBC Music Magazine, and named “a conductor to watch” by Seen and Heard International. Of a recent performance with The Clarion Choir, The New York Times praised his “deft guidance” and commented: “An inspired interpretation. Mr. Fox revealed the drama of the score with vivid dynamic shadings. Intonation and pacing were exemplary throughout the performance.” For his recording, “Kastalsky: Memory Eternal” with the Clarion Choir, he was nominated in the category of Best Choral Performance at the 61st Grammy Awards

Steven Fox is Artistic Director of New York’s renowned Clarion Orchestra and Clarion Choir. Over his tenure, the group has expanded its repertoire from Salamone Rossi to Aaron Copland. He has led the Clarion Society in highly acclaimed performances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the White Light Festival at Lincoln Center, the Miller Theatre at Columbia University, and Carnegie Hall. He continues to lead the Clarion Society in concert appearances throughout the New York metropolitan area. He recently conducted a new production of Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte for L’Opéra de Québec.

After finishing his studies at London’s Royal Academy of Music, Steven Fox traveled to Russia, where he founded the country’s first period-instrument orchestra, Musica Antiqua St. Petersburg, reviving a lost repertoire of 18th-century Russian music from the court of Catherine the Great. Subsequently, he premiered the earliest symphony by a Ukrainian composer, Symphony in C by Maksym Berezovsky (c. 1770), which he has conducted in London, St. Petersburg and New York, and Russian composer Dmitri Bortniansky’s final opera, Le fils rival, which he conducted at the Hermitage Theater.

Fox has appeared as a guest conductor with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra in San Francisco, the Handel and Haydn Society in Boston, Juilliard415 at Lincoln Center, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra and the Quebec Symphony Orchestra. Recently he was an Associate Conductor for New York City Opera. He has also served as Assistant Conductor for the Metropolitan Opera Lindemann Young Artist Program and Juilliard Opera.

Other recent guest conducting engagements have included Handel’s Judas Maccabaeus in Vilnius, Lithuania, with Jauna Muzika; and Mozart’s Sparrow Mass at St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. He has given master classes in Historical Performance at Yale University and Dartmouth College, and in early oratorio at The Juilliard School.

Steven has given master classes and clinics at his alma mater Dartmouth College, The Juilliard School and Yale University. He is a preparatory conductor for the Yale University Schola Cantorum, and Lecturer in Music at the State University of New York, Purchase College.

Steven Fox Receives Grammy Nomination for Best Choral Performance

Steven Fox is nominated for Best Choral Performance at the 61st Grammy Awards

Source:https://variety.com/2018/music/news/grammy-nominations-2019-complete-list-1203082934/

Steven Fox Named Third Music Director of Cathedral Choral Society

The Cathedral Choral Society announced the four-year appointment of Steven Fox as Music Director beginning with the 2018-19 season. As its third Music Director, Fox will succeed Dr. J. Reilly Lewis who led the chorus from 1985 until 2016. Fox will serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017-18 season.

Source:https://www.cathedralchoralsociety.org/steven-fox

‘Semele’ Review: A Delicious Mashup of Genres

“‘The superb 28-member Clarion Choir was a revelation: Full-voiced, with rhythmic precision and articulation as clear as the orchestra’s, the ensemble easily switched gears from the sensual languor of “Endless pleasure, endless love” to the moving, oratorical statement of the opera’s dark lesson: ‘Nature to each allots his proper sphere / But that forsaken we like meteors err: / Toss’d through the void, by some rude shock we’re broke, / And all our boasted fire is lost in smoke.’”

– Heidi Waleson, The Wall Street JournalRelated Link

The English Concert Brings a Marvelous ‘Semele’

“…A Marvelous Semele…The English Concert, a superb period instrument orchestra whose annual spring visit to Carnegie is a must for Handel-lovers… were joined by the aptly named Clarion Choir (Steven Fox, artistic director) and six splendid soloists, all led by the conductor Harry Bicket…the choruses may be the glory of “Semele.” Act II — when it looks like Semele and Jupiter, in the form of a mortal man, are going to live in sensual bliss — ends with the sumptuous ‘Bless the glad earth.’”

– Anthony Tommasini, The New York TimesRelated Link

“Endless pleasure” in Bicket’s Semele at Carnegie Hall

“Choruses were delivered with clarity and purpose by the glorious Clarion Choir (under Steven Fox’s excellent direction and training), while arias, loving, sensual, playful, and invariably florid, were superbly handled by the soloists.”

– Robert Levine, BachtrackRelated Link

Concert: Clarion Choir/Steven Fox at the Royal Academy of Music, London NW1

It’s a big thumbs-up for an expertly paced, mystically contemplative performance full of light and shade.

Rimsky-Korsakov looks away, seemingly unaware of the camera. Next to him is Stravinsky, staring directly at us. And there’s a third, less familiar composer in this intriguing domestic photo. Maximilian Steinberg: classmate, friend, rival of Stravinsky; the pupil of Rimsky-Korsakov who became his successor at the St Petersburg Conservatory (and his son-in-law); a teacher of Shostakovich. Posterity had largely ignored Steinberg’s music until 2014 when Cappella Romana gave Passion Week its first public performance, in America, more than 90 years after it was written.

And it’s a find, as the beautiful UK premiere by the Clarion Choir demonstrated. Indebted to Grechaninov’s Passion Week and Rachmaninov’s All-Night Vigil, this 1920-23 a cappella work for Holy Week is infused with ancient Russian orthodox chants. Indisputably sacred, it had to be hidden from the anti-religious Bolsheviks. Was it written as an act of defiance or as a memorial to a threatened heritage? Whatever the reason we should be thankful that Steinberg managed to get the score published in Paris.

There’s a mystical quality, a whiff of incense, to Passion Week and, as the music ebbed and flowed, I was lulled into a wonderful, contemplative state. That was down also to the quality of the performance; expertly paced by the conductor Steven Fox, the singing was fluid and full of light and shade. Fresh from the St Petersburg and Moscow premieres, the Clarion Choir gave us its best Church Slavonic. After the encore, amid copious applause, one of the singers gave a cheery thumbs-up to someone in the audience. Well, a big thumbs-up from me too.

– Rebecca Franks, The TimesRelated Link

Clarion Choir Delves Into the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, a Rachmaninoff Rarity

To kick off 2015 a year ago, Trinity Wall Street presented a performance of Rachmaninoff’s Vespers by the Clarion Choir at St. Paul’s Chapel as part of its Twelfth Night Festival. Reviewing elsewhere that night, I couldn’t hear it, but to judge from all reports, the performance must have been stunning.

When I first glanced at the program for the current festival and saw that Rachmaninoff was again scheduled for New Year’s Eve at St. Paul’s, I simply assumed that it was the Vespers music, and that Trinity had established it as an annual fixture. As well it might have: Beautiful and grandly mystical, the work exudes a spiritual force that is deeply moving and restorative.

But no, weeks later I discovered that the work to be performed on Thursday was Rachmaninoff’s Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. Written in 1910, five years before the Vespers, it is a work of similar scale, style and spirit, but unlike that composition, which has pretty much entered the standard repertory, the Liturgy is seldom performed except by specialist groups like the valuable Russian Chamber Chorus of New York.

So much the better, then, that Clarion branched out. And its performance, with 26 strong singers led by the group’s artistic director, Steven Fox, was indeed stunning.

Written for use in an actual service, the Liturgy has parts for a deacon, typically leading long litanies in a monotone chant, and freer parts for the celebrant. As is usually done in stage performance, Mr. Fox cut back some passages “tailor-made for a service,” according to a booklet note, “but which make less sense in the context of a concert performance.”

As the deacon, the bass Philip Cutlip was wonderfully solid and, in a properly understated way, expressive. As the celebrant, the tenor Marc Andrew Day had greater freedom to soar, and his lines did so thrillingly. And the soprano Sherezade Panthaki sang a brief solo most attractively.

All were also members of the superb chorus, which had obviously been finely drilled by Mr. Fox and well schooled in the pronunciation of Church Slavonic, presumably by a diction coach not identified. (If it was Mr. Fox, the more power to him.)

You have to hope that with this presentation, Clarion has opened the way to a different kind of annual tradition: exploring the Russian liturgical repertory more broadly, perhaps starting with Tchaikovsky’s Vespers and Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom and continuing with the revelatory “Passion Week” of Maximilian Steinberg, which Clarion helped to unearth. And there is much more worthy repertory where all of that came from.

– James R. Oestreich, The New York TimesRelated Link

Chicago Music of the Baroque Debut

“This unusual setting for soprano, chorus, organ and brass ensemble blends angular harmonies with an unapologetic theatricality…Fox led a sumptuous performance that built to a rousing Vistavison climax.”

– Lawrence A. Johnson, Chicago Classical ReviewRelated Link

Sacred Work, Written in Secret in Leningrad

“Maximilian Steinberg’s ‘Passion Week’ arrived in New York on Tuesday evening in a stunning performance by the Clarion Choir, conducted by Steven Fox at the Church of St. Jean Baptiste on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.”

– James R. Oestreich, The New York TimesRelated Link

Harmonic Complexity That Moved Its Maker

“Under Mr. Fox’s deft guidance, the choir’s voices blended beautifully, with alluring details of phrasing and dynamics admirable from the opening … The choir sounded radiant in the poignant ‘Rejoice, O Virgin,’ with a hushed, intense intimacy that bloomed into a full-blooded, gorgeous sheen. Mr. Fox revealed the drama in the score with vivid dynamic shadings. In ‘Blessed Is the Man,’ the ‘Alleluias’ unfolded with characterful contrast; first solemn, then impassioned, before concluding with an introverted whisper. Intonation and pacing were exemplary throughout the performance.”

– Vivien Schweitzer, The New York TimesRelated Link

Missionary Zeal, Baroque Style

“Steven Fox, Clarion’s artistic director … conducted the beautifully rendered program … spirited, polished playing from the instrumentalists and a well-blended, joyous sound from the choir.”

– Vivien Schweitzer, The New York TimesRelated Link

Abstract Expressionism in Aural Mixed Media

– Anthony Tommasini, The New York TimesRelated Link

 

Maximilian Steinberg: Passion Week – | Released 08/11/2016


Audio

J.S. Bach: Christmas Oratorio – “Brich An”

J.S. Bach: Christmas Oratorio – “Ehre Sei Gott”

Handel: Judas Maccabeus – “Hear Us, O Lord”

Steinberg: Passion Week – “Arise, O God”

Monteverdi: Vespro della Beata Vergine – “Et Exultavit Humiles”

Video

Documents

Short Biography

Conductor Steven Fox has been called “visionary” by BBC Music Magazine, and named “a conductor to watch” by Seen and Heard International. Of a recent performance with The Clarion Choir, The New York Times praised his “deft guidance” and commented: “An inspired interpretation. Mr. Fox revealed the drama of the score with vivid dynamic shadings. Intonation and pacing were exemplary throughout the performance.” For his recording, “Kastalsky: Memory Eternal” with the Clarion Choir, he was nominated in the category of Best Choral Performance at the 61st Grammy Awards

Steven Fox is Artistic Director of New York’s renowned Clarion Orchestra and Clarion Choir. Over his tenure, the group has expanded its repertoire from Salamone Rossi to Aaron Copland. He has led the Clarion Society in highly acclaimed performances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the White Light Festival at Lincoln Center, the Miller Theatre at Columbia University, and Carnegie Hall. He continues to lead the Clarion Society in concert appearances throughout the New York metropolitan area. He recently conducted a new production of Mozart’s Die zauberflöte for L’Opéra de Québec.

Full Biography

Conductor Steven Fox has been called “visionary” by BBC Music Magazine, and named “a conductor to watch” by Seen and Heard International. Of a recent performance with The Clarion Choir, The New York Times praised his “deft guidance” and commented: “An inspired interpretation. Mr. Fox revealed the drama of the score with vivid dynamic shadings. Intonation and pacing were exemplary throughout the performance.” For his recording, “Kastalsky: Memory Eternal” with the Clarion Choir, he was nominated in the category of Best Choral Performance at the 61st Grammy Awards

Steven Fox is Artistic Director of New York’s renowned Clarion Orchestra and Clarion Choir. Over his tenure, the group has expanded its repertoire from Salamone Rossi to Aaron Copland. He has led the Clarion Society in highly acclaimed performances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the White Light Festival at Lincoln Center, the Miller Theatre at Columbia University, and Carnegie Hall. He continues to lead the Clarion Society in concert appearances throughout the New York metropolitan area. He recently conducted a new production of Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte for L’Opéra de Québec.

After finishing his studies at London’s Royal Academy of Music, Steven Fox traveled to Russia, where he founded the country’s first period-instrument orchestra, Musica Antiqua St. Petersburg, reviving a lost repertoire of 18th-century Russian music from the court of Catherine the Great. Subsequently, he premiered the earliest symphony by a Ukrainian composer, Symphony in C by Maksym Berezovsky (c. 1770), which he has conducted in London, St. Petersburg and New York, and Russian composer Dmitri Bortniansky’s final opera, Le fils rival, which he conducted at the Hermitage Theater.

Fox has appeared as a guest conductor with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra in San Francisco, the Handel and Haydn Society in Boston, Juilliard415 at Lincoln Center, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra and the Quebec Symphony Orchestra. Recently he was an Associate Conductor for New York City Opera. He has also served as Assistant Conductor for the Metropolitan Opera Lindemann Young Artist Program and Juilliard Opera.

Other recent guest conducting engagements have included Handel’s Judas Maccabaeus in Vilnius, Lithuania, with Jauna Muzika; and Mozart’s Sparrow Mass at St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. He has given master classes in Historical Performance at Yale University and Dartmouth College, and in early oratorio at The Juilliard School.

Steven has given master classes and clinics at his alma mater Dartmouth College, The Juilliard School and Yale University. He is a preparatory conductor for the Yale University Schola Cantorum, and Lecturer in Music at the State University of New York, Purchase College.